Quick Answer: Is Utterly An Adjective Or Adverb?

Is Fair an adverb or an adjective?

When you say “fair” (in the sense of “pale” or “just”), it is an adjective: fair maiden, fair decision, etc.

The adverb form is “fairly,” as in “I was treated fairly by the court.”.

What is another word for said?

What is another word for said?aforementionedabovementionednamedrevealeddeclaredsuggestedcommunicatedsaid earliermentioned earliertold63 more rows

Is the word fairly an adverb?

We use fairly as an adverb meaning ‘in a way which is right and just’: We also use fairly as an adverb of degree before adjectives and adverbs to mean ‘quite, but less than very’: … He’s fairly tall.

Is somewhat an adverb?

Somewhat means to some extent. An example of somewhat used as an adverb is in the sentence, “He is somewhat hungry,” which means that he is not starving, but he is not full either.

What does the word of mean?

(Entry 1 of 3) 1 —used as a function word to indicate a point of reckoningnorth of the lake. 2a —used as a function word to indicate origin or derivationa man of noble birth. b —used as a function word to indicate the cause, motive, or reasondied of flu.

Is utterly formal?

To answer your other question, while utterly isn’t truly colloquial, it’s best to avoid it in formal settings.

Is utterly an adjective?

The adjective utter is often used as an intensifier to mean “total” — often with negative connotations (like “utter failure”). As a verb, the word has a totally unrelated meaning: to speak or to articulate a sound. If you utter something, you give it voice.

What type of word is utterly?

Utterly is an intensifying word: something utterly delicious is very, very delicious. When you’re laying it on thick, utterly is an utterly useful word: it means something similar to completely, totally, or very. …

What does despair mean?

loss of hopeloss of hope; hopelessness. someone or something that causes hopelessness: He is the despair of his mother.

What is the definition of adverb?

An adverb is a word that modifies (describes) a verb (he sings loudly), an adjective (very tall), another adverb (ended too quickly), or even a whole sentence (Fortunately, I had brought an umbrella). Adverbs often end in -ly, but some (such as fast) look exactly the same as their adjective counterparts.

Is it proper to say with that being said?

4 Answers. Both “that said” and “that being said” are common (possibly too common) and perfectly grammatical, and sufficiently formal as well. “Having said that” is also correct, but to be correct the subject in what follows must be whoever said that (usually “I”).

What word can I use instead of that?

What is another word for that?et ceterawhateverwhatnotanythingetceterasuchlikealletc.othersall that8 more rows

What means utter?

verb (used with object) to give audible expression to; speak or pronounce: unable to utter her feelings; Words were uttered in my hearing. to give forth (cries, notes, etc.) with the voice: to utter a sigh.